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Steelhead in Orlando ICAST/IFTD report

In Steelhead Files by Dwayne MeadowsLeave a Comment

Each year in Orlando the entire fishing industry gets together for their trade show,  ICAST/IFTD. It’s the place where everyone who makes a living off the tug on the end of a hook gathers to see what is new, take orders from dealers and learn about trends in the industry, including conservation issues.   With so many industry professionals present the …

Frank Moore Bill advances in Senate

In Oregon by Shauna Sherard2 Comments

Portland, OR (July 13, 2016) – A bill that would protect more than 100,000 acres in Douglas County, Oregon took another step forward today as it passed through a mark-up in the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. The Frank Moore Wild Steelhead Sanctuary Designation Act (S. 1448) would permanently safeguard an area that contains some of the …

You have to start small to think big

In Oregon by Shauna SherardLeave a Comment

  By Sam Davidson In 2006, the Pajaro River on California’s central coast came out of obscurity to make national headlines—for the wrong reason: it was named the most endangered river in America. Historically, the Pajaro was one of the most productive steelhead streams in this region. Old-timers in Watsonville and other local communities recall chromers stacked like cordwood in …

Rivers of Resilience – Asotin Creek

In California, Idaho, Oregon, Science Friday, Steelhead Files, Washington by Nick Chambers1 Comment

Asotin Creek is a tributary that drains into the Snake River near the town of Asotin in eastern Washington.  With a drainage area of 250 square miles, Asotin Creek is slightly larger than the Wind River, but also much smaller than the Yakima River watershed.  Like the Yakima, the basin is located in a semi-arid environment. Most of the watershed …

Rivers of Resilience – Wind

In Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Science Friday, Steelhead Files, Washington by Nick ChambersLeave a Comment

The Wind River, a tributary to the Columbia River just above Bonneville Dam, is, at only 224 square miles, a substantially smaller drainage than the Yakima. It receives more precipitation and thus is dominated by forests and industrial timberlands. The Wind River has had some habitat restoration but nowhere near the extent of the Yakima, but that is also because …